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The Resource Word myths : debunking linguistic urban legends, David Wilton; Illustrated by Ivan Brunetti

Word myths : debunking linguistic urban legends, David Wilton; Illustrated by Ivan Brunetti

Label
Word myths : debunking linguistic urban legends
Title
Word myths
Title remainder
debunking linguistic urban legends
Statement of responsibility
David Wilton; Illustrated by Ivan Brunetti
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Amateur, no make that professional logophile and word origins website editor Wilton corrects the mistakes many of us make in what we believe are the origins of words and phrases. He begins by examining the origins of these fallacies, and why we persist in perpetuating them. Fully armed, he then goe.
  • "This fascinating collection of myths about word origins should be a joy to read."-Don McCreary, Department of English, University of Georgia
Biographical or historical data
David Wilton, a writer, lives in California. He runs the popular website Wordorigins.com.
Cataloging source
UK-WkNB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Wilton, David
Dewey number
422
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Brunetti, Ivan
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • Language and languages
  • Usage & grammar guides
  • Dialect, slang & jargon
  • Languages
  • Usage & grammar guides
  • Dialect, slang & jargon
Summary expansion
Do you "know" that posh comes from an acronym meaning "port out, starboard home"? That "the whole nine yards" comes from (pick one) the length of a WWII gunner's belt; the amount of fabric needed to make a kilt; a sarcastic football expression? That Chicago is called "The Windy City" because of the bloviating habits of its politicians, and not the breeze off the lake? If so, you need this book. David Wilton debunks the most persistently wrong word histories, and gives, to the best of our actual knowledge, the real stories behind these perennially mis-etymologized words. In addition, he explains why these wrong stories are created, disseminated, and persist, even after being corrected time and time again. What makes us cling to these stories, when the truth behind these words and phrases is available, for the most part, at any library or on the Internet? Arranged by chapters, this book avoids a dry A-Z format. Chapters separate misetymologies by kind, including The Perils of Political Correctness (picnics have nothing to do with lynchings), Posh, Phat Pommies (the problems of bacronyming-the desire to make every word into an acronym), and CANOE (which stands for the Conspiracy to Attribute Nautical Origins to Everything). Word Myths corrects long-held and far-flung examples of wrong etymologies, without taking the fun out of etymology itself. It's the best of both worlds: not only do you learn the many wrong stories behind these words, you also learn why and how they are created-and what the real story is
Target audience
general
Label
Word myths : debunking linguistic urban legends, David Wilton; Illustrated by Ivan Brunetti
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Hardback
  • Originally published in: 2005
Control code
9780195172843
Dimensions
22x15x2 cm.
Extent
240 p.
Isbn
9780195172843
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Other physical details
8 cartoons
Specific material designation
regular print
Label
Word myths : debunking linguistic urban legends, David Wilton; Illustrated by Ivan Brunetti
Publication
Note
  • Hardback
  • Originally published in: 2005
Control code
9780195172843
Dimensions
22x15x2 cm.
Extent
240 p.
Isbn
9780195172843
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Other physical details
8 cartoons
Specific material designation
regular print

Library Locations

    • Kensington Central LibaryBorrow it
      Phillimore Walk, London, W8 7RX, GB
      51.5014572 -0.1944621
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